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Tag: Heavy menstrual periods

When does my teenage daughter need a Pap smear?

As a practicing Ob/Gyn providing healthcare for female patients, I often get this question from mothers regarding their tween/teenage daughters.  Though the guidelines for requiring the first Pap smear have changed, to start at age 21, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommends the first 'reproductive health visit' at ages 13-15.  This initial visit may not require a pelvic exam, unless your daughter is having menstrual difficulties (pelvic pain, menstrual cramping, abnormal/heavy periods) or is sexually active.  Contraceptive options, STD prevention, and the HPV vaccine may be discussed at this visit.
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Tidbits on your Gynecologic Healthcare...Throughout the week!

Is this Depression or PMS? According to ACOG, "Depression and anxiety disorders are the most common conditions that overlap with PMS. About one half of women seeking treatment for PMS have one of these disorders. The symptoms of depression and anxiety are much like the emotional symptoms of PMS. Women with depression, however, often have symptoms that are present all month long. These symptoms may worsen before or during their periods. Your health care provider will want to find out whether you have one of these conditions if you are having PMS symptoms." (posted 7/9/13 by @drsuzyyhall)


Breast/Nipple Discharge? Though most cases of nipple discharge (especially occurring with stimulation or expression of the breast) are benign (non-cancerous), an evaluation/exam by your doctor is usually warranted. (posted 5/28/13 by @drsuzyyhall)

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/nipple-discharge/MY00467/DSECTION=causes


Low Libido? Studies have shown Testosterone supplementation to be effective in treating low libido in menopausal women.  While Estrogen Therapy may not directly effect libido, it does promote increased vaginal lubrication, improving vaginal pain with sex. Testosterone supplements are not approved by the FDA for treatment in women. Speak with your healthcare provider regarding safety concerns. (posted 4/3/13 by @drsuzyyhall.)

 

 

 

 


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Considering the Novasure procedure for Heavy Periods?...Answers to 5 Common Patient Questions

 

Heavy menstrual flow is a common occurrence affecting 10-35% of women, and a common reason for visits to the gynecologist.  Though the causes for heavy menstrual periods (menorrhagia) vary, the Novasure endometrial ablation procedure is an excellent treatment option for many women, when child-bearing is completed.

As an Ob/Gyn physician with greater than 10 years of experience performing the Novasure procedure (and with hundreds of satisfied patients having selected the procedure), I thought it may be helpful to discuss common questions from patients considering the procedure as their treatment of choice. Here are my answers to 5 common patient questions regarding the Novasure procedure:

 

1. How is the procedure performed?/What can  I expect from my menstrual flow after the procedure…lighter periods or no period?

The procedure is considered minimally invasive, performed through the vaginal aspect without surgical incisions.  The Novasure wand (containing a triangular mesh) is inserted within the uterus, where a short (less than 2 minute) cauterization of the uterine lining occurs.  The procedure may be performed in an outpatient surgical setting (with anesthesia) or possibly in your doctor’s office.  You should expect to be back to normal activities within a day or so.

Several research studies on the results of the Novasure procedure note over 90-95% patient satisfaction with the procedure.  Expected results range from notably lighter menstrual periods (for most patients)…to skipped/or absent menstrual flows (up to 40% of patients.)  It’s not possible to predict for patient’s what result they will get, but when questioned overall, most patients are (very) satisfied with the results achieved.


 

 

Suzanne Hall, MD, FACOG

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Heavy Menstrual Flow: “My Period is Heavy…But What’s ‘Too Heavy’?”

Heavy menstrual periods (medically termed ‘menorrhagia’) is a common GYN concern, and a frequent reason for women visiting their doctors.  10-35% of women report heavy menstrual periods in population-based studies.  Though patients may not know the clinical definition of menorrhagia, I believe them when they report ‘heavy periods’… (based on relative changes in their flow compared to when their period was more ‘normal’…or based on their perception of the flow being ‘heavier than normal’.)

Menorrhagia is clinically defined as menstrual flow lasting longer than 7 days…or greater than 80ml (5-6 tablespoons) blood flow…but who really knows how to measure blood flow that way? Admittedly, for both patients and physicians, blood loss is difficult to quantitate by these measures.  More relevant descriptions of heavy menstrual flow may include
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My Retched Menstrual 'Cramps'?!

At 15 years old I remember asking myself, “Is this what they mean by menstrual ‘cramps’?”  The term ‘cramp’ just seemed too mild to explain the horrid, 1 or 2 day experience, which regularly preceded the start of my monthly  period.  Back pain, ‘front’ pain, nausea, and sweats…felt more like a suffering from the flu…with an elephant stepping on my back!... than what I’d describe as menstrual ‘cramps’.  The usual ‘mother’s home remedies’ like a heating pad, hot tea, or over-the-counter pain reliever, hardly ever seemed to do enough, but I adhered to the regimen every month anyway…What else was I going to do?

 

As a Gynecologist, I now know the significance of the menstrual ‘cramps’.  In our rhythmic, monthly, hormonal cycle, and in response to the rise in our ovarian hormones (estrogen and progesterone), our ovaries form the ‘dominant follicle’, which releases the fertilizable egg for that month.  At the same time, the uterine lining develops a thick, shaggy layer (like a shag carpet) to enhance implantation of a fertilized egg (egg fertilized by a male sperm=pregnancy.)  On the other hand, if no egg fertilization occurs (no pregnancy), the ovarian hormones decline, allowing for release/shedding of the previously developed thickened uterine lining tissue (representing our ‘menstrual flow’), and the obvious sign of menstrual bleeding.

(cont'd)


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Uterine Fibroid or Polyp? Ever Wondered What they 'Look' Like?

Check out this amazing 'life-like' computerized graphic video of fibroids from simulated Myosure procedure!

 

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'How' Will My Hysterectomy be Performed?

Understanding the Routes of Hysterectomy


When you and your gynecologist have decided on hysterectomy as the treatment of choice for your gynecologic diagnosis, there are several routes by which a hysterectomy may be accomplished. A total hysterectomy is the surgical removal of the uterus, and when indicated, the additional removal of the fallopian tubes and ovaries (termed salpingoophorectomy) may be recommended.


There are several routes by which a hysterectomy can be performed. You and your gynecologist will decide on the safest route for your hysterectomy based upon the reasons and clinical circumstances for the hysterectomy, your health history and the surgeon's clinical expertise.

The 4 main routes by which a hysterectomy is performed are abdominally, laparoscopically, Davinci assisted laparoscopically or vaginally. In an abdominal hysterectomy an abdominal skin incision (similar to a cesarean section incision) is made to accomplish the surgery. This route is especially advantageous when large uterine fibroids or significant abdominal adhesions are anticipated, allowing for more exposure to accomplish the surgery safely. Compared with the other minimally invasive routes, abdominal hysterectomy generally requires a longer hospital stay and longer recovery time.

Laparoscopic hysterectomy involves the use of a narrow camera (termed a laparoscope) and surgical instruments placed through small abdominal skin incisions to detach the uterus, which is then most commonly delivered through the vagina. This route may be selected when abdominal adhesions or a moderate-to-large sized uterus are suspected. The advantage with this minimally invasive approach is a shorter hospital stay and faster recovery time, when compared with abdominal hysterectomy. Your surgeon may offer Davinci hysterectomy, an advanced form of laparoscopic surgery, with proposed improved precision, visualization, and technical capabilities, for more complex procedures.

In the vaginal route (termed vaginal hysterectomy) the uterus is completely removed through the vagina, thereby avoiding any abdominal incisions. This route may be selected for a normal-to- moderately enlarged uterus, for pelvic organ prolapse, or when significant abdominal adhesions are not suspected. As with laparoscopic and Davinci hysterectomy, a shorter hospital stay and faster recovery are expected.

Though hysterectomies are the most common gynecologic surgery performed among women in the United States , any surgical procedure has inherent risks. Hysterectomy may be the best choice for your gynecologic condition. Be sure to consult with your physician in understanding the risks versus benefits…and your options.

drsuzyyhall

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